Glacier lagoon, Iceland

Awestruck by the beauty of the south coast, today we head towards the majestic Vatnajokull National park. Vatnajökull National Park is one of three national parks in Iceland. It encompasses all of Vatnajökull glacier and extensive surrounding areas. These include the national parks previously existing at Skaftafell in the southwest and Jökulsárgljúfur in the north. There’s no other national park on earth that offers such a mixture of volcanic activity, glaciers, mountains and geothermal energy. 

Skaftafella

Svartifoss, a beautiful waterfall cascading over cliffs of black basalt columns. The route is about 1.5 hours return, and suitable for every level of fitness. The black of the rising basalt columns with the contrast of the clear water falling down is a pleasure to watch.

Basalt columns and cascading waters.

Sjónarnípa

Sjonarnipa is a view point to the glacier tongue. Characterized by huge ice mountains in the background and free floating ice in the lagoon, this is picturesque and pristine. Its a short walk from the entrance of the park which takes you through its varied landscape.

At the glacier tongue.

Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon

Perhaps the most popular attraction along the south coast, Jökulsárlón is a massive lagoon at the base of the Vatnajökull Glacier. Fed by one of the glacier tongues, large chunks of glacier ice are forever breaking off into the water, chaotically floating around until being washed out to sea. The vast lagoon is also home to seals, playing around in the water and often popping their heads up to check out the humans. One of the most popular things to do is to go out sailing amongst the ice , throwing you in the middle of this surreal world. Hands freeze and eye lids become heavy as you approach this natural beauty, but the thrill to see it from the naked eye is most exciting and worth every trip.

Do visit my post titled “An icy encounter ” to enjoy its majestic views along with a short video taken from the boat.


Diamond Beach

The Diamond Beach is a strip of black sand belonging to the greater Breiðamerkursandur glacial plain, located by Jökulsárlón glacier lagoon on the South Coast of Iceland.

Here, the icebergs which fill Jökulsárlón glacier lagoon wash up on shore, standing dazzling and defiant in stark contrast to the black sand beach. It is, therefore, a favourite amongst photographers, nature-lovers, and wildlife-enthusiasts. Many seals call this beach home, and it is one of the best places in the country to see orcas from the shore.

The name ‘Diamond Beach’ thus comes from the white ice on the black sand appearing like gemstones or diamonds, as they often glisten in the sun and sharply contrast their jet black surroundings.

Drenched with the Icelandic beauties we made way towards a small fishing town named Hofn where we spent the night before heading out to another adventure.

This brings us to the end of our south coast tour of Iceland before heading towards the east tomorrow.

Happiness and sunshine 🙂

Nidhi

Do check out my other posts on Iceland here ;

The Golden circle

The Jokulsarlon glacier

Reykjavik – the heart of Iceland

The black beach

The South Coast, Iceland



5 Comments Add yours

  1. pvcann says:

    amazing forms of ice.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We could not click all , shades of blue floating on icy cold water. The most amazing part was to see the ice break away from the glacier. Huge icebergs.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. pvcann says:

        Yes, wonderful experience.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Great photos, I’ve really wanted to go there for a long time!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Go and I am ensure you will not regret 🙂

      Like

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