Once a little boy went to school …

Once a little boy went to school.

One morning

The teacher said:

“Today we are going to make a picture.”

“Good!” thought the little boy.

He liked to make all kinds;

Lions and tigers,

Chickens and cows,

Trains and boats;

And he took out his box of crayons

And began to draw.

But the teacher said, “Wait!”

“It is not time to begin!”

And she waited until everyone looked ready.

“Now,” said the teacher,

“We are going to make flowers.”

“Good!” thought the little boy,

He liked to make beautiful ones

With his pink and orange and blue crayons.

But the teacher said “Wait!”

“And I will show you how.”

And it was red, with a green stem.

“There,” said the teacher,

“Now you may begin.”

The little boy looked at his teacher’s flower

Then he looked at his own flower.

He liked his flower better than the teacher’s

But he did not say this.

He just turned his paper over,

And made a flower like the teacher’s.

It was red, with a green stem.

On another day

The teacher said:

“Today we are going to make something with clay.”

“Good!” thought the little boy;

He liked clay.

He could make all kinds of things with clay:

Snakes and snowmen,

Elephants and mice,

Cars and trucks

And he began to pull and pinch

His ball of clay.

But the teacher said, “Wait!”

“It is not time to begin!”

And she waited until everyone looked ready.

“Now,” said the teacher,

“We are going to make a dish.”

“Good!” thought the little boy,

He liked to make dishes.

And he began to make some

That were all shapes and sizes.

But the teacher said “Wait!”

“And I will show you how.”

And she showed everyone how to make

One deep dish.

“There,” said the teacher,

“Now you may begin.”

The little boy looked at the teacher’s dish;

Then he looked at his own.

He liked his better than the teacher’s

But he did not say this.

He just rolled his clay into a big ball again

And made a dish like the teacher’s.

It was a deep dish.

And pretty soon

The little boy learned to wait,

And to watch

And to make things just like the teacher.

And pretty soon

He didn’t make things of his own anymore.

Then it happened

That the little boy and his family

Moved to another house,

In another city,

And the little boy

Had to go to another school.

The teacher said:

“Today we are going to make a picture.”

“Good!” thought the little boy.

And he waited for the teacher

To tell what to do.

But the teacher didn’t say anything.

She just walked around the room.

When she came to the little boy

She asked, “Don’t you want to make a picture?”

“Yes,” said the little boy.

“What are we going to make?”

“I don’t know until you make it,” said the teacher.

“How shall I make it?” asked the little boy.

“Why, anyway you like,” said the teacher.

“And any color?” asked the little boy.

“Any color,” said the teacher.

And he began to make a red flower with a green stem.

~Helen Buckley, The Little Boy

(HT Amanda White)

I donโ€™t want to comprehend this, please let me know your thoughts in the comments below.

Happiness and sunshine ๐ŸŒผ

Nidhi

17 Comments Add yours

  1. We constrain ourselves and our children with rules and conformity. Be free, smile and let us embrace all the flowers, trees, animals and dishes of the world with wonder and excitement. ๐Ÿ™‚ It’s a really good lesson to remember each time we judge and put objects/people in boxes. Thank you for this share dear Nidhi. Wish you a beautiful weekend. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you ans wish you the same Krishnapriya ๐ŸŒผ

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Jaya Avendel says:

    I think this story shows us the value of choice. The first teacher required her class to copy her while the second teacher gave her students to draw what they pleased. While the boy may have drawn a red flower with a green stem, it was his choice the second time round rather then the teacher’s.

    Choice is important.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes it was his choice , but his choices were never let to explore previously and hence the damage .

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Jaya Avendel says:

        That is a very true statement.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Krishna says:

    Beautiful story dear Nidhi โค๐Ÿ˜Š May we guide children, but respect their imagination and growth of creativity. We should not put them in a mould we make and expect them to fit in it. Let they grow naturally ๐Ÿ˜Š

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Krishna , have a beautiful day ๐ŸŒผ let them be , let them free ..

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Krishna says:

        Beautiful day to you too dear ๐Ÿ˜Š๐ŸŒธ

        Liked by 1 person

  4. I just felt painful after reading this

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Itโ€™s fine that we understand this pain and convert it into smiles by not over controlling the future generations .

      Like

      1. For sure ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Brilliant- if you get time, search for Sir Ken Robinson TedTalk on Education – it has a similar rendition towards the end

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for this share , will surely check
      It out ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sure ๐ŸŒธ๐Ÿ˜Š

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Checked this now, it is brilliant . Thank you so much for the share ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

  6. michnavs says:

    Thank you for sharing this story…its heartwarming..

    Liked by 2 people

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